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Virtual Curriculum Fair

January 14th, 2013
Homeschooling Hearts & Minds Virtual Curriculum Fair Button

A number of homeschool bloggers are sharing their thoughts on various subjects each week in January.

This week the topic was math and science and you might enjoy some of the posts below:

Delight Directed Middle School Science?  by Susan @ Homeschooling Hearts & Minds
http://homeschoolheartandmind.blogspot.com/2013/01/delight-directed-middle-school-science.html

The Hardest Part of Math by Kristi @ The Potter’s Hand Academy
http://www.thepottershandacademy.com/the-hardest-part-of-math/

A Tour Through Our Math and Science Life by Christy @ Unexpected Homeschool
http://unexpectedhomeschool.blogspot.com/2013/01/vcfmath.html

What Works for Us…Math by Piwi Mum @ Learning & Growing the Piwi Way
http://piwiprincess.blogspot.com/2013/01/what-works-for-usmath.html

Math Art – Geometry by Julie @ Highhill Education
http://highhillhomeschool.blogspot.com/2013/01/math-art-geometry.html

It’s Math-magical by Missouri Mama @ Ozark Ramblings
http://oramblings.blogspot.com/2013/01/its-math-magical.html

Virtual Curriculum Fair: Fun and Games with Math by Tonia @ The Sunny Patch
http://thesunnypatch.blogspot.com/2013/01/virtual-curriculum-fair-fun-and-games.html

Discovering Patterns by Lisa @ The Golden Grasses
http://goldengrasses.blogspot.com/2013/01/discovering-patterns-how-to-teach-
math.html

Math for the Natural by Erin @ Delighting in His Richness
http://delightinginhisrichness.blogspot.com/2013/01/math-for-natural.html

Virtual Curriculum Fair~ Discovering Patterns by Karyn @ Teach Beside Me
http://www.teachbesideme.com/2013/01/virtual-curriculum-fair-discovering.html

Too Many Math Programs or Not by Linda B @ Homeschooling6
http://training6hearts4him.blogspot.com/2013/01/too-many-math-programs-or-not.html

Virtual Curriculum Fair:  Math and More!  by April @ Coffee, Cobwebs,
and Curriculum
http://coffeecobwebsandcurriculum.blogspot.com/2013/01/virtual-curriculum-fair-math-and-more.html

The post where I admit I was wrong by Kristen H. @ Sunrise to Sunset
http://sunrisetosunsethomeschool.com/2013/01/14/the-post-where-i-admit-i-was-wrong/

High School Math – Beyond the Textbook by TechWife @ A Playground of Words
http://playgroundofwords.blogspot.com/2013/01/high-school-math-beyond-textbook.html

Discovering a World of Logic and Order by Joelle @ Homeschooling for His Glory
http://homeschoolingforhisglory.blogspot.ca/2013/01/virtual-curriculum-fair-discovering.html

2013 Virtual Curriculum Fair- Discovering Patterns: Mathematics,
Logic, and Science by Leah C @ As We Walk Along the Road
http://courtneysix.blogspot.com/2013/01/2013-virtual-curriculum-fair.html

The Plans of Mice and Math (My Math in Focus review) by Chelli @ The
Planted Trees
http://theplantedtrees.blogspot.com/2013/01/virtual-curriculum-fair-2013-plans-of.html

Rightstart Math is right for us! by Leann  @ Montessori Tidbits
http://www.montessoritidbits.com/2013/01/rightstart-math-review-games.html

Our Favorite Homeschool Math Curriculums by Wendy @ Homeschooling Blessings
http://wendy-homeschoolingblessings.blogspot.com/2013/01/our-favorite-homeschool-math-curriculums.html

Author: admin Categories: Homeschool tips Tags:

Getting Your Elementary or Middle School Aged Children Started Learning Spanish

November 17th, 2012

Guest post by Debbie Annett
Author of Spanish for You! – A Simple, Effective, Affordable Curriculum for Grades 3-8

You CAN give the GIFT of language. Parent or teacher, Spanish speaker or not, YOU ARE
ABLE to accomplish more than just vocabulary learning with your elementary and middle
school students. It just takes knowing a little about the language learning process and how to
do it.

The Language Learning Process
Language learning takes time and practice, much like learning to play an instrument or a sport.
Becoming fluent takes many years, unless your student(s) is in an immersion situation where
he/she is using Spanish with Spanish speakers for several hours every day.

However, most parents would like their children to become fluent by the time they are adults.
This means that you have many years to accomplish the goal. So, get your students started in
elementary or middle school. You can work on things steadily, over time, in a non-stressful
way.

If you are not a language teacher, knowing something basic about the language learning
process will help you should you decide to get started on your own. You can do this!

We can break language down into 2 elements, receptive and expressive. Receptive refers to
the language we receive and need to understand. That would be listening and reading.
Expressive refers to the language we express and use to make ourselves understood. That
would be speaking and writing.

When we first learn a language we learn the receptive piece. Think of babies learning their
first language. They come to understand all that they receive from those speaking around
them and slowly begin to express themselves. First they say words, then phrases, then more
over time. They learn the receptive piece first and then develop the expressive piece.

When teaching a language you want to provide students opportunities to read and listen, and
then slowly get them to write and speak. Their EXPRESSIVE language should be encouraged
first as words, then phrases, and then sentences.

And know this – speaking is the most difficult piece. Spoken fluency is the icing on the cake.
And that will come after many years of steady practice and study. YOU, as the parent or
teacher, are getting them started and preparing them for higher level learning in high
school and maybe college.

How to Do It
You know some basics about the language learning process. Now, how do you get started?

First, choose a curriculum/product that is:
1. easy to use – meaning it has a lesson guide or something you follow
2. can be used by a Spanish teacher or not, or for self-study
3. provides lots of audio, so you can hear what is in the book – important!
4. provides lots of self-checking practice
5. provides a variety of practice activities to develop listening, speaking, reading, and
writing skills
6. provides opportunities to practice with others – this means the product can be used by
individuals AND has the flexibility to be used with others.
7. does more than just teach vocabulary and phrases. You do not want your student(s) to
just memorize some things. You want your student(s) to learn how the language works.
8. economical - this is not a must, BUT there are some good ones out there that provide all
the above and accomplish A LOT without the big price tag! (Ahem, Spanish for You! is one!)

Second, decide on your approach and schedule.
1. If your approach is to create a class or be teaching in a school, then decide how much
time you have each week to devote to Spanish and how much outside of class you want
students to practice. For example, you might schedule a class 1 hour each week with 4 days
of homework, 10-20 min. each day. OR one class for 1/2 hour a week with 2 to 4 days of
homework, 10-15 min. each day, etc.

2. If your approach is at home for self-study, then decide how much time you have each
week to devote to Spanish. You may schedule your efforts 20 minutes 3 times a week, OR 30
minutes twice a week, etc.

NO MATTER YOUR APPROACH WHAT IS IMPORTANT IS THAT YOU KEEP IT STEADY.
If you “fall off the wagon” occasionally do not fret. Just pick back up and keep going. You want
to look at the big picture. If you have kept things going steadily 80% of the time, for example,
things will be fine. It is when you “fall off the wagon” most of the time that you may not get
results.

(A side note – It is ok to take summers off, or holiday time off. You will not ruin your efforts. During
summers it helps to do a little review here and there, just to stimulate the brain and keep those
connections going.)

As you can see, it is VERY possible for you to begin your student(s) learning Spanish even if
you do not have experience with the language or teaching. You just need to know some
basics about the language learning process and how to do it. You just need to work steadily
over time. Do that, and you will have something of value.

If you would like to learn more about the Spanish for You! curriculum, please visit us at
www.spanish-for-you.net.

I wish you all the best in your language learning efforts!

Our curriculum plans and link to more

August 6th, 2012

Not Back to School Blog Hop

The new year!
We have a couple weeks yet before we begin. August 22 is our official start date at this point, but at least we know where we are headed.

I made myself a master list like the following but just with the generic subjects listed and then a box for each day of the week. Then I won’t forget what they should be doing each day. And, I can use it to record their grades for each assignment in each subject which will make record keeping so much easier.

In the past I would pull out their individual notebooks and pull their grades off the top of each graded assignment. Now, I will just record it all onto my master sheet throughout the week and just have one paper of info to put into the computer on the weekend. That will make my weekend job a 15 minute one rather than an hour long one.

Lots of the same. We know what works for us and what we love, but some new stuff, too. Of course, since we don’t really follow the regular school calendar, many of these books and subjects they are already in the midst of.

I am streamlining a bit this year and doing history all together. Obviously their homework and their interaction with the material will be quite different over the 8 year age span, but we will all be in the same time period and it will tie into our Bible time as well. Science for all 2-8th will be the same as well. My 8th grader already finished Physical science and General Science so she gets to have fun with us this year as she isn’t really ready for high school science yet.

I am mixing up grammar this year. We love Rod & Staff, but it gets a little repetitive year after year. So, I am going to switch every other year and pepper in Shurley and Easy Grammar. We gave both of these an introductory run during our summer school and they seem to fill the need well.

High School continues to stretch us, but mostly in a good way. This year we will tackle Spanish and Advanced Mathematics (including pre-calc) together.

Nathan — 2nd grade
First Language Lessons (mostly oral)
Saxon Math 3 (already half way through)
Handwriting without tears — big focus!! Trying to improve his pencil grip and penmanship this year
All About Spelling level 3 (almost done)
Truth quest History (Beginnings — ties into Bible)
Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology
PE — baseball, gym and swim, PE at co-op
Brooke – 3rd grade
Rod & Staff English 3 (half way through)
Saxon Math 5/4 (half way through)
All About Spelling level 3 (almost done)
Truth quest History
Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology
A Reason for Handwriting T (half way through)
PE — soccer, gym and swim, PE at co-op
Faith – 6th grade
Easy Grammar Level 1
Saxon Math 8/7 (half way through)
All About Spelling level 4
Truth quest History
Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology
PE — soccer, gym and swim, PE at co-op
Paige – 8th grade
Shurley English 7
Algebra 1 (half way through)
Puppetry (Co-op)
IEW Level B (Co-op, I’m teaching)
All About Spelling level 4
Truth quest History
Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology
PE — soccer, gym and swim
Blake – 10th grade
Apologia Chemistry (Co-op)
PE — baseball, gym and swim, PE at co-op
Bible
Spanish 1
Advance Mathematics (Saxon)
IEW Level C (Co-op, I’m teaching)
Truth quest History
Full days, but wonderfully full. I look forward to another year of exploring life and our amazing world with my kids. In between it all we continue to enjoy the antics of a two year old who breathes new life into everything. Thankful to God for another opportunity to live life in the midst of my family each day.

ICHE summary

June 14th, 2012

Homeschool conventions have an amazing way of exhausting and exciting me at the same time.

Wanted to share some of the great resources and speakers I enjoyed this past weekend.

Not to overwhelm, we’ll tackle excerpts from two of them today.

First, the College Board rep gave a little lunch time talk on CLEP tests.

She offered lots of helpful info on CLEP exams that made them seem a little more within reach.

CLEP:

- offers huge savings over paying for college, even community college, tuition

- Recommended the book College without Compromise and the CLEP official test book that comes out each year and is available for Amazon.

- No penalty for wrong answers.

- No age restrictions (her kids have taken them as early as 7th grade — earning college credit in middle school!)

- Immediate results. Because it is computer based and you can take it at a variety of times throughout the year, you get an immediate result and know if you pass or not before heading home.

- accepted at 2900 colleges. However, as I was looking at some local ones, the extent they accept them does vary a bit. Some will only accept some of them as elective credits. Others require a higher score than the minimum. So, if you are CLEPping specifically to save on college tuition, do your homework ahead of time with potential colleges.

She gave great tips on actually taking the test including using the practice tests after you have completed high school course work in the subject area. She recommended when practicing to make sure to get two tests in a row with scores in the high 50’s before you attempt the actual test. And, celebrate pass or fail, your kids deserve a reward for all the hard work.

She has a website of her own as well, Credits before College

The official CLEP website has lots of info, or course.

***************************************************

Another speaker, Janice Campbell offered some great insight into grading pieces of writing.

Her website has a number of great resources that you might find helpful, especially in teaching junior and senior high students. She had tips for teaching writing as well as some general teaching tips.

Check out all her info and resources at Everyday Education.

Here are a few of the points that I appreciated from what she had to say:

- In order to evaluate and encourage better writing in your student you need a rubric (which you can find at her site when you give your email), a handbook (to reference specific rules that the student needs to work on), a thesaurus, and a dictionary

- When grading the rough draft you first grade only content. Don’t get bogged down in specific words and mechanics. The rough draft first needs to be adjusted to get the information in an orderly format that completes the assigned writing task. Later revisions will get into the details of style.

- The goal is to teach the student to edit and evaluate themselves (a rubric helps significantly with this because it makes grading so much more concrete).

She shared many more specifics about evaluating writing, but those were the big ones that stuck with me and will have a great impact on how I read and evaluate my kids’ writing.

Did you go to ICHE? Have a favorite workshop?

Resources from ICHE Preschool Panel

June 8th, 2012

Welcome, parents of preschoolers! Here you will find the list of some resources that those of us on the panel have used and enjoyed with our preschoolers. Please feel free to share these and ask any further questions you may have! Praying for you during this exciting and exhausting season in life.

Resources for the Preschool Years

Books / Curriculum/Media Resources

Reading – Sing, Spell, Read and Write; www.singspell.com

- Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons by Engelmann

Math – Abeka Arithmetic Workbooks; www.abeka.com

Character – Character First! Resources; http://www.characterfirst.com/aboutus/students-families/

Development – Slow and Stead, Get Me Ready by June Oberlander

Choosing Books – Honey for a Child’s Heart by Gladys Hunt

Curriculum – Before Five in a Row by Jane Claire Lambert; http://fiarhq.com/fiveinarow.info/index.html

Montessori – “Bringing Montessori Home” DVD – Rose Clancy; www.tacklemedia.com

Bible – The Bible in Pictures for Little Eyes by Kenneth N. Taylor

- Leading Little Ones to God by Marian M. Schoolhand

Websites

www.christainbook.com – homeschooling books and resources

http://www.rainbowresource.com/ – more homeschooling books and supplies than you can even imagine

www.education.com – Worksheets and activities searchable by grade level.

http://homeschoolshare.com/ - This site has numerous unit studies and lapbook resources, specifically ones related to Before Five in a Row and Five in a Row

http://www.starfall.com/ – Games for preschoolers to play. Especially at
the preschool age, I don’t let my kids sit and play on their own, but these
might be a fun addition to time you spend with your preschooler

http://www.homeschoolcreations.net – This is a website I find helpful for kids of all ages. A homeschool mom of 4 has shared all her printables and many plans and ideas from throughout her homeschooling time. She has focused a lot on the preschool years in particular.

Other

Local Public Library- Swan Library System – allows you to search for desired books through multiple library systems and have books delivered to your local library.

Museum Adventure Pass: from your library you can get free or reduced admission to various museums. This is for the Chicago area, but other states have similar programs.

A CD called Sounds like Fun from Discovery Toys (http://www.amazon.com/Sounds-Like-Fun-Discovery-Toys/dp/B0012NBP4E) is a great compilation of songs that cover early math, letter sounds, opposites, manners, nursery rhymes and even some Spanish sung to some classical guitar. Useful quiet time CD.

Games are an engaging way to incorporate learning fun at the preschool age and beyond — Zingo can develop basic word and sound recognition; Candyland for colors; Junior Monopoly for counting (and many other “junior” versions of favorite classics); Legos and Playmobile; other educational boardgames (great gifts for Grandparents to give if they are asking for ideas) like Sunken Treasure (http://www.amazon.com/Sunken-Treasure-Adventure%C3%83-Phonics-Beginning/dp/B00004TDTN)

Learn through work: sorting socks and other laundry is an effective early math exercise as is cooking and baking together (math and health lesson there); plant a garden; talk about money, checks, credit cards (never too young to learn healthy money habits)

A favorite pre-reading activity we have used: write large letters on pieces of paper spread around the room or with chalk on ground outside. Say a letter sound and have kids run (or hop or crawl) to the letter they just heard. Use capital or lower case or both depending on what they are learning.

Let kids “write” in salt or sand in a pie tin or plate, pudding (or whipped cream or shaving cream) in a sealed plastic bag is great messless finger painting or water and a paintbrush on the ground outside. Also make letters with playdough, pipe cleaners, sticks, fingers or their whole body.

Field trips – http://chicagolandhomeschoolnetwork.com/fieldtrips/

Recipe for Kool-aid Playdough (large batch)

5 cups flour

1 cup salt

4 pkgs kool-aid, any flavor

1/2 cup oil

3-4 cups boiling water (start with 3 and add more until kneadable)

Interactive Whiteboards

October 17th, 2011

I have seen these whiteboards at work in a handful of classrooms and they are simply amazing. If you are looking for a major techy upgrade for your homeschool room it might be a consideration, or more likely a great purchase for a co-op. The applications for this type of tool are endless! I know I have a couple strong visual learners that would love this kind of addition.

As a homeschooler, you’re probably looking for new and exciting ways to keep learning alive in your family. Keeping students connected to your lessons is key to a good learning experience. If you are looking for a great piece of technology to add to your classroom, you may want to consider an interactive whiteboard.

Promethean Activboard+2

An interactive whiteboard is typically a wall mounted flat screen that projects your computer’s display. The whiteboard becomes interactive when you use your finger or a stylus to manipulate the contents of the flat screen via remote tablet. You can mark answers, move items or perform whatever functions are needed.

A Dell interactive whiteboard could be the right choice for your classroom needs. You can use the whiteboard to teach any subject. There are interactive whiteboards that provide basic features and come as a wall mounted unit. As with most computer based equipment, there are many upgrades available, including an interactive whiteboard that is portable, with a large viewing screen, a built-in projector device and even a two-sided dry erase board attached along the side of the interactive board for additional notes to be displayed. This top of the line unit can revolutionize a regular classroom into a super learning environment.

With a Dell interactive whiteboard, you can provide a dynamic learning experience to keep the attention of even the most distracted student. Students expect to be engaged during educational exercises. You can provide the interactive component with Dell’s whiteboard and the associated software. You can even provide sound to keep your student’s attention on the board.

Interactive whiteboards are taking education to a new level with technology we only dreamt of a number of years ago. The days of overhead projectors are gone, and even Power Point presentations are becoming less important because of this amazing technology. If you are struggling to keep your students glued to the subject at hand, you should definitely consider an interactive whiteboard system. Students need visual and interactive stimulation to keep them engaged while learning, and this type of system has become an incredible way to do just that. Being successful at keeping students engaged is not only rewarding for the student but also for the educator.

~ Guest contributor

Science fair tips

September 26th, 2011

Your local science fair will be here before you know it! Check out this site for great tips on getting started now. :)

SFC fall 2011 email image small
A New Twist on Science Fair Projects

Impress the judges this year with a clever and unique winning science fair display that will turn heads.

Visit Science Fair Central for new project ideas, an interactive display board and tips to get started and guide you and your students through the science fair process.

At Science Fair Central parents, students and science fair coordinators will find all the resources needed to ensure an exciting and fun-filled science fair season this year.

  • Project samples
  • Customizable timelines
  • Detailed checklists
  • Judging criteria
  • Shopping lists
  • Rebates and special offers

Encourage students to get involved in science fairs and give them the opportunity to practice science investigation and invention . Science fairs can be the first step in developing future young scientists and engineers. Visit Science Fair Central to get started!

FtoColleague

Dual Credit E-book

July 18th, 2011
The Official Homeschooler’s
Guide to Dual Credit
Get your free copy hereDownload the eBook and share it for a chance to win an iPad 2
Dual credit—earning college credit in high school—is
the hottest trend going in homeschooling.

Some estimates show that 42,000 homeschoolers will earn dual credit during the 2011-2012 school year.

So to help you plan the best options for your homeschooler, which may include dual credit, you’re invited to get a free copy of this new dual credit eBook:

The Official Homeschooler’s Guide to Dual Credit: How Combining High School and College Can Set Your Student on the Path to Success

Go here now to get your free copy of the eBook.

The dual credit eBook is written by Kelly Negvesky, a homeschool mom and one of the nation’s foremost authorities on homeschool curriculum and dual credit.

As a reader of The Home Educating Family Magazine, you can get a free copy of the eBook here.

Download eBook

In this eBook you will learn:

  • How Dual Credit Works
  • How Homeschool Students Benefit From Earning Dual Credit
  • 3 Ways Your Homeschooler Can Earn Dual Credit
  • How Dual Credit Impacts Your Student’s High School Transcript
  • Beyond Dual Credit: The 4 Skills Demanded By Colleges & Employers
  • Click here to get your free dual credit eBook now

    Forum for local homeschooling moms to connect

    May 17th, 2011

    God this message from a reader about an opportunity especially for area homeschoolers to connect online:

    This discussion group is open to any and all home educators in the greater Naperville, IL area.

    Non-locals also welcome and you will enjoy our extensive links section. Feel free to post questions concerning home education, list field trips, let others know of activities you’ve found in the area,  promote your home education support group, tell us about great resources and events etc.

    This cyber forum is not affiliated with any particular support group, nor any specific religious group, nor any one homeschooling philosophy. Polite home educating parents of all stripes are welcome. Disrespectful hotheads and spammers will be immediately and unceremoniously tossed out by the moderator.

    Find out more about this group . . .

    Naperville Home Educators

    Website: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NapervilleHomeEducators/

    Homeschooling and Housework, too

    March 1st, 2011

    works for me wednesday at we are that family

    Homeschool moms often lament that once they find their groove homeschooling, they realize that they lost everything else they had in place in the process. Homeschooling isn’t so hard if the rest of life didn’t get in the way.

    I have also heard it said in various ways that we have three areas that need our attention: great meals, quality teaching, and a clean house. However, people should not expect more than two of those to take place on any given day. I might add, a good night’s sleep to that list also.

    Since schooling obviously can’t be compromised, we need to somehow figure out how to fit the other areas into our schedule at least at a satisfactory level on a routine basis. I would not necessarily consider myself an expert in this area, but more often than not I can go to bed with a clear conscience that my kids won’t get botchulism, we all have at least one clean outfit to put on in the morning, they are a day further down their educational track, and with a little creativity, we can probably find three meals’ worth of food around the house the following day, plus the half dozen snacks that they often require.

    Here are some tips that I have learned along the way to maintaining order and my own sanity in the midst of homeschooling:

    - Set boundaries. This is a great place to start. Does your school day have set hours? You might want to avoid answering the phone or checking email during those times. Any distraction from outside the house can most likely wait a few hours until the learning goals for the day are accomplished.

    - Establish a routine. I know routines are not for everyone, but for me they give me such freedom, because once they are in place, life just flows. We have recently gone through a move, after having my in-laws move in, after having a baby, and life has been anything but routine. But, when my kids got up in the morning they knew they needed their beds made and clothes on. They knew what to expect from breakfast (and I knew what I was making). Even though routines need tweaking now and then, they can release our mind to worry about everything else on our plate and know the basics are covered.

    - Keep the morning simple. I love to have a clean house to start the day. But, if I spend the time scrubbing and nagging the kids about getting everything spotless, we won’t start school until after lunch. So, the morning is basic. Get yourself ready, eat, and clean up breakfast. The rest of the house can be clean in time for a relaxing evening together, but I needed to ignore it in the morning so school could get done.

    - Get everyone involved. They help make the mess, they help clean it. With the possible exception of the 9 month old, everyone has chores, and I’ll admit, even the 5 year old has kind of a lot. I need to make homeschooling a priority, which means my kids do end up doing more chores  at home than their public school counterparts. We don’t have a hired janitor in our school, so when we do a messy project, we clean up the mess. We live in our house all day long, so it needs more cleaning than the families that are gone 8-4. I need to expect some extra messes, but that doesn’t mean that I should expect to clean them all up myself. It amazes me what a beautiful job my kids can do when they take the time and get rewarded for their work (even if it is just a dose of abundant praise).

    - Start ‘em young. By two or three years of age my kids begin to have a chore routine. It starts very basic, mostly learning self care. Making beds, picking up their room, clearing their place at the table. They have a responsibility just like anyone else. They know this and take great pride in being like the big kids.

    - Use your weekends. I don’t mean to ruin your weekend with cleaning, but we do take some time on the weekend to tackle bigger cleaning projects and hopefully make sure that our week starts with a fairly clean house.

    - Teach good habits. This takes lots of time and consistency, but when my kids habitually clean up after themselves, turn lights off, leave a place better than they found it, feel responsible for the appearance of the house, and learn to see tasks that need doing, our house is a different place. This is an ongoing process. We have definitely not arrived in this area, and I continue to grow my kids’ good habits. Reminders, group effort, lots of praise, and over time they, too, can mature into an adult that could care for a place of their own. I need to remember that I’m not raising kids, I’m raising future adults. It all has a purpose down the road.

    Coming up I will share some of the specific ways I tackle laundry, meals, kids’ chores, and other areas of housekeeping. Any particular questions that you struggle with? Feel free to add them to the comments here or on facebook to hopefully get some inspiration from other homeschoolers as well.

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