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Guest Post: How To Help A Child With A Learning Disability Get Involved In The Arts

November 5th, 2018

 

Photo via Pixabay by EvgeniT

Many parents struggle with getting their kids interested in different subjects; for some, it’s math or science, while others have a hard time relating to the arts. All types of learning are important for kids, but for children who are living with a disability, being able to express feelings and ideas through creative endeavors is essential. That’s why it’s so important to help your child get interested in the arts, whether it’s dance, music, drawing or painting, or theater.

 

Many children who are diagnosed with a learning disability simply need to find different ways to take in information or to get their ideas across. Creative pursuits of all kinds can help your child find new forms of expression, reduce stress and anxiety, and learn how to perform better in school. There are several ways you can introduce the arts to your child at home, and many of them are fun for the entire family.

Keep reading for some tips on how to help your child with a learning disability get involved in the arts.

 

Create a hobby room

Creating a space dedicated to arts, crafts, and other hobbies will help your child feel safe and comfortable, and will reduce distractions. Set up a table and get organized by using bins with deep drawers to hold glitter, crayons, paint, markers, scissors, glue, yarn, and pieces of fabric. If you’re able to utilize an entire room for hobbying, paint the walls with easy-to-clean glossy paint, or use chalkboard paint on one wall to encourage spontaneous creativity. Designate a special area just for displaying your child’s artwork so he’ll stay motivated to keep making things.

 

Get out the needle and thread

Sewing is a great pastime for kids; it’s a calm, quiet activity that requires focus and concentration, and it can help build up strength in both those areas. It also requires patience. Sewing and textile crafts will allow your child to get creative while learning how to practice mindfulness, which reduces stress and anxiety. As long as your child is old enough to work with needles and scissors, look for some projects he can do with fabric and thread. It doesn’t have to be a traditional sewing craft; for instance, you can have him draw a simple picture on a canvas and use a needle and thread to fill it in. For more great tips and resources on sewing projects, click here.

 

Give him a variety

Most kids like to have some variety when it comes to their hobbies, especially if they get bored easily. Look for several different kinds of creative activities and allow your child to try a few to see which ones he likes best. Some kids are great at making art but just aren’t that into it; others love music but aren’t sure if they would rather sing, play an instrument, or dance. Giving your child some creative freedom will allow him to find the thing that makes him feel most alive.

 

Make learning fun

Many kids with learning disabilities struggle in school because they feel bored or unchallenged by the curriculum, or because they are frustrated by their inability to comprehend the material. You can help make learning fun by incorporating creativity and educational lessons; for instance, let your child help you in the kitchen. Talk about measuring, chemical reactions, and following a recipe while baking cupcakes, then let him decorate the finished product any way he wants.

 

Millions of kids in the U.S. live with a learning disability, and not all of them are diagnosed. It can be difficult for most children to identify these issues in themselves, leaving them frustrated and unfulfilled in school. Helping your child find new ways to express himself will help him now and for years to come.

LearningDisabilities.info was created to offer information and understanding to parents of children with learning disabilities, as well as adults who are in need of continued support to succeed.

Review and Giveaway: A Mile in His Shoes

January 18th, 2012


For kids that struggle with special needs or whose parents find them trying to manage a diagnosis they might sometimes feel trapped into what society “allows” them to do. Now and then someone enters that scene and sees only the potential and can bring hope and opportunity where none had existed before.

When a coach of a struggling farm team stumbles on a teenage boy with an amazing pitching arm, he doesn’t let Asperger’s blind his eye to the potential in this young man. The father unwillingly lets his son go, not ready to release his protection over the unpredictable nature.

My family enjoyed the story of this bright boy that just needed a chance to shine. The story is inspiring and engaging, the actors believable, and the ending satisfying.

It could have done without the discussion of the difference between a “player” and a “playah,” although it stayed pretty innocent. And, the father’s protective role was portrayed as anger-filled at times. But, in the end the family is intact and healthy and the good guys win. A good, clean movie that we were able to watch as a family.

For more info check out their links:


And, you to can get a copy of this movie for free! I have the privilege of hosting a giveaway:
To be entered in a giveaway for this family film, please leave a comment on this post. For a second entry, share about this giveaway through some social media outlet and come back and leave a second comment. Contest open to US continental residents only. Make sure I have your email address so I can contact you as well.
The contest will close on January 29th in the evening.

“Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or

services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it

on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally

and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance

with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the

Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”